*JOURNAL

A home for mixed mediums, experimentation with photography, writing, case studies, and things I like. Welcome to my version of a blog.

Composition, Shape, and Color

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These images may feel extremely repetitive, but my intention throughout this study was to slow down to focus on a single place and be able to apply composition to simple shapes. For obvious reasons, most of this shoot was inspired by design and complementing colors. Most of my favorite photographers were originally designers. The way they use space, color, and an expert understanding of composition is unlike any traditional photographer. Namely, Michael O'Neal is the biggest influence for me in this area. There is so much to learn from clean, simplistic capturing principles, and photographers who use this understanding to their advantage are in a much better position than those who simply shoot at f/1.4 and blow out the background to isolate a subject. While there is a place for that type of shooting, simple composition decisions will always be king in that area and having a less lazy understanding of these principles will elevate work in a way that is much easier on the eyes. Below, I've listed my focus, control, and practical application.

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FOCUS:
- Composition
- Line shape
- Complementing colors

CONTROL:
- White Balance, 5900k
- Aperture, f/7.1
- Focal Length, 70mm
- Shooting at high noon

PRACTICAL APPLICATION:
As mentioned before in the main portion of the article, digging my heels into design decisions for composition is the smartest way to move forward in better understanding for stronger images. Here, focusing on shape and where a balance lands provided me the opportunity to understand how composition can be broken and where its approach cannot. 

Tyler PhenesComment